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Details for receptor: CRF-R1

EndoNet ID: ENR00941

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Synonyms

  • CRF-R1
  • corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1
  • CRH-R1
  • CRF1
  • corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1
  • CRF-R

General information

  • CRF type 1 and CRF2 were expressed in the adrenal cortex, particularly in the zonae fasciculata and reticularis but very weakly or undetectably in the medulla. [1]
  • CRH-R1 in the hippocampus is involved in the enhancement of stress-induced learning. [2]
  • CRF1 mediates ACTH responses to stress. [1]
  • CRF1 activates and CRF2 attenuates the stress responses in the central nervous system. [1]
  • CRH-R1 was present at a very low level in the substantia nigra. [2]
  • CRH-R1 was found in heart, stomach, kidney, adrenal, placenta and strong expressed in lung and skeletal muscle. [2]

Links to other resources

UniProt P34998
Ensembl ENST00000457569

Subunit information

Sequence
SLQDQHCES LSLASNISG LQCNASVDL 
IGTCWPRSP AGQLVVRPC PAFFYGVRY 
NTTNNGYRE CLANGSWAA RVNYSECQE 
ILNEEKKSK VHYHVAVII NYLGHCISL 
VALLVAFVL FLRLRSIRC LRNIIHWNL 
ISAFILRNA TWFVVQLTM SPEVHQSNV 
GWCRLVTAA YNYFHVTNF FWMFGEGCY 
LHTAIVLTY STDRLRKWM FICIGWGVP 
FPIIVAWAI GKLYYDNEK CWFGKRPGV 
YTDYIYQGP MILVLLINF IFLFNIVRI 
LMTKLRAST TSETIQYRK AVKATLVLL 
PLLGITYML FFVNPGEDE VSRVVFIYF 
NSFLESFQG FFVSVFYCF LNSEVRSAI 
RKRWHRWQD KHSIRARVA RAMSIPTSP 
TRVSFHSIK QSTAV
UniProt P34998-2

Binding hormones

  • urocortin
    • Urocortin activates CRH-R1. [3]
    • Ucn1 has a 6-fold higher affinity for CRF1 than CRF. [1]
  • CRH

Anatomical structures with this receptor

  • isocortex

  • cerebellar_cortex

  • amygdaloid_body

  • ovary

  • cell_of_endometrium_of_uterus

  • skin

  • pituitary_gland_of_diencephalon

  • brain_stem

  • testis

  • cell_of_adrenal_gland_zona_reticularis

  • cell_of_adrenal_gland_zona_fasciculata

  • epidermis

  • hair_follicle

    Influences

    • positive cortisol
      • Isolated human hair follicles secrete substantial levels of cortisol and this activity is further up-regulated by CRH. [4]

    Induced phenotypes

    • hair follicle maturation
      • Corticotropin releasing hormone modulates important functional hair growth parameters in vitro (hair shaft elongation, catagen induction, hair keratinocyte proliferation, melanin production). [4]
    • positive regulation of transcription
      • Microdissected, organ-cultured human scalp hair follicles respond to CRH stimulation by up-regulating proopiomelanocortin (POMC) transcription and immunoreactivity for ACTH and ╬▒-MSH, which must have been processed from POMC. [4]
  • sebaceous_glands

  • eccrine_gland

  • epithelial_hair_matrix_cell

  • hippocampus

  • substantia_nigra

  • thalamus

  • heart

  • lung

  • skeleton_muscle

  • stomach

  • kidney

  • placenta

  • mast_cell

    Influences

    • positive histamine
      • CRH activates mast cells via CRH-R1 to release of histamine and from there, vasodilation and increased vascular permeability. [2]
    • positive VEGF-165
      • Activation of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 leeds to selective release of VEGF without granulation.

    Induced phenotypes

    • mast cell activation
      • Corticotropin-releasing hormone is secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects, possibly through mast cell activation. [5]
  • adrenal_gland

    Induced phenotypes

    • negative regulation of immune response
      • Hypothalamic secretion of CRH leads to suppression of immune response indirectly via stimulation of glucocorticoid secretion from adrenal glands. [6]
  • central_nerve_system_element

    Induced phenotypes

    • regulation of HPA axis
      • Corticotropin-releasing hormone is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. [5]
  • cell_of_intermediate_pituitary

  • brain

    Influences

    • positive antidiuretic hormone
      • Basal HPA axis may be affected by magnocellular CRF that directly stimulates the AVP secretion through a paracrine mechanism at the level of neurohemal zone of the neurohypophysis. [7]
  • paraventricular_nucleus_of_hypothalamus

    Influences

    • positive CRH
      • CRF may modulate its own biosynthesis as well as that of its type-1 receptor through an ultra-short positive feedback loop. [8]

    Induced phenotypes

    • hyperactvity of HPA axis
      • Systemic deficit in insulin and corticosterone results in opposite effects on the central expression of CRF and CRF-R1. Uncontrolled diabetes led to a decrease in CRF expression in parvocellular PVN. Insulin and corticosterone deficiency have the opposite effects on the hypophysiotropic CRF and CRF-R1. Alterations in the brain CRF system due to insulin deficiency may contribute to the hyperactivity of the HPA axis in diabetes. [7]
      • Basal HPA axis may also be affected by magnocellular CRF that directly stimulates the AVP secretion through a paracrine mechanism at the level of neurohemal zone of the neurohypophysis. [7]
    • hyperdipsia
      • Systemic deficit in insulin and corticosterone results in opposite effects on the central expression of CRF and CRF-R1. Uncontrolled diabetes led to a decrease in CRF expression in parvocellular PVN. Insulin and corticosterone deficiency have the opposite effects on the hypophysiotropic CRF and CRF-R1. Alterations in the brain CRF system due to insulin deficiency may contribute to the hyperdipsia in diabetes. [7]
    • hyperphagia
      • Systemic deficit in insulin and corticosterone results in opposite effects on the central expression of CRF and CRF-R1. Uncontrolled diabetes led to a decrease in CRF expression in parvocellular PVN. Insulin and corticosterone deficiency have the opposite effects on the hypophysiotropic CRF and CRF-R1. Alterations in the brain CRF system due to insulin deficiency may contribute to the hyperphagia in diabetes. [7]
Reference